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Domestic Violence

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Lauren Pozen, KSPR News and lpozen@kspr.com | November 9, 2012
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. - Domestic violence is now front and center in Springfield. A recent study by the Springfield Police Department found the number of reports here are up.That increase is putting a strain on shelters. Harmony House has had to turn away over 800 people this year due to lack of space. They have just 80 beds. Harmony House uses every inch of space available. Danielle Conti with Harmony House said, "You are taking people that are coming from really traumatic difficult situations that need time to heal and process and feel safe and we have as many as eight women in room with bunk beds lined up. " Space is tight, but they make it work.
NEWS
Joanna Small and Ben Knaup and Reporter and Photographer | December 22, 2011
  On the seven month anniversary since the Joplin tornado- a domestic violence increase since that tragic day.   Staff members at Joplin's only shelter for battered women certainly have that perception.  Some of the hard numbers say otherwise though.   We know that traumatic events cause stress and pressure, which in turn can lead to criminal activity, especially violence against the ones we supposedly love.   We saw it happen after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the Gulf Coast, but not everyone agrees it's happening in Joplin.
NEWS
Mary Moloney, KSPR News Reporter and mmoloney@kspr.com | June 7, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- There is a massive effort to help end crime in your neighborhood. Springfield police put eight violent people behind bars this week in a domestic violence roundup. Police targeted people with more than one domestic violence offense. The increased focus on repeat violent offenders is part of the Springfield Police Violence Initiative. In the fall of 2012, police recognized 70 percent of all aggravated assaults in Springfield were related to domestic violence. To help address this problem, police, prosecutors, and other key players collaborated with the Harmony House to form the Family Violence Task Force.
NEWS
by Sheena Elzie, KSPR News and selzie@kspr.com | October 1, 2012
The observance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month in October brings up a growing problem at local shelters. More victims are coming in for help, but there's not enough space to help at shelters such as Harmony House. Harmony House is one of the largest shelters in the state for domestic violence victims, and even there room comes at a premium. Last year, Harmony House was forced to turn more than 700 domestic violence victims away -- the facility holds 110 families, and staff members say they're full all year.
NEWS
Mary Moloney, KSPR News Reporter and mmoloney@kspr.com | April 2, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Alice Beauchamp lived a lifetime of abuse. "I was raped when I was 18 and then I was raped several times, actually 10 times all together and abused for like 27 years," she said, her voice cracking. "So, this is the first time I'm able to talk about it. " Beauchamp talked about the three people who abused her. She talked about the rapes, beatings, and intense emotional abuse. "He kept telling me that I couldn't do anything and he controlled me," Beauchamp said of one person.
NEWS
by Joanna Small, KSPR News and Reporter and Photographer | January 24, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- How would you feel if your doctor asked if you were the victim of domestic violence?  That's the recommendation by a national preventive services task force. Domestic abuse affects one in the three women and one in four men, but the officials who help these people say getting them to come forward can be a challenge, and this new recommendation may help overcome that. "He used to hit me in the side of my head. " Ann is no stranger to pain. "I was pregnant with the baby and he put all of his weight on my stomach, put his hands around my throat," she said.
NEWS
by Jonah Kaplan, KSPR News and jkaplan@kspr.com | July 17, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo -- Social workers say many times abuse is about control, and some aggressors are using family pets to maintain that control. Counselors at abuse shelters say that leaves victims with the tough choice of saving their pets or saving themselves. The trend in domestic violence, they add, is pets getting caught in the middle. In some cases, pets are used as bait; the aggressor abuses and tortures them to get back at their spouse. That's what Shannon Norman says happened last spring: her husband took out his anger on both her and her beloved chihuahua, Chucho.
NEWS
Jonah Kaplan, Emily Rittman, Kuba Wuls, Ben Knaup and Reporter, Reporter, Photographer, Photographer | July 12, 2011
Neighbors say a terrible smell made them call police to the scene of a possible murder suicide. Police found a man and a woman dead inside a duplex bedroom in the 1400 block of west Mt. Vernon. “The stench just came up through the basement and went through the vents,” neighbor Cody Meyer said. During Tuesday’s heat wave, something grabbed several neighbors' noses. “Bryce started puking and I was like ‘what's wrong’ and he said ‘the smell,’” neighbor Tanya Meyer said.
NEWS
Leigh Moody and Anchor | December 12, 2012
A federal study shows the homeless rate is down nationwide but Missouri is bucking the trend. The study shows the homeless rate is up almost 14 percent in Missouri over the past year, meaning shelters like the Missouri Hotel in Springfield remain close to or at capacity. Overall, there are more than 10,000 people living in the Show-me state without a roof over their heads. Two specific areas of concern are the five-percent rise among homeless veterans and homeless victims of domestic violence, which is up nearly 20-percent from this time a year ago. There are a couple of bright spots in the research, though.  The chronically homeless population went down by 22 percent and youth homeless rates dropped by about 31 percent.
NEWS
Mary Moloney, KSPR News Reporter and mmoloney@kspr.com | July 26, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Springfield police believe alcohol and domestic violence motivated murder. Prosecutors charged 30-year-old Jonathan Greer for the death of his girlfriend, Angela Holbrook. Investigators said Greer shot and killed Holbrook Thursday after the couple fought. "She was a good mom and she was a good friend to people and she would do anything for you," said Jared Allen outside the house where Holbrook died. "This is truly unfortunate as to how far this went and definitely could be prevented in a different way. " Early Thursday morning, neighbors around the 3300 block of E. Sunset heard arguing.
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NEWS
Mary Moloney, KSPR News Reporter and mmoloney@kspr.com | July 26, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Springfield police believe alcohol and domestic violence motivated murder. Prosecutors charged 30-year-old Jonathan Greer for the death of his girlfriend, Angela Holbrook. Investigators said Greer shot and killed Holbrook Thursday after the couple fought. "She was a good mom and she was a good friend to people and she would do anything for you," said Jared Allen outside the house where Holbrook died. "This is truly unfortunate as to how far this went and definitely could be prevented in a different way. " Early Thursday morning, neighbors around the 3300 block of E. Sunset heard arguing.
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NEWS
by Jonah Kaplan, KSPR News and jkaplan@kspr.com | July 17, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo -- Social workers say many times abuse is about control, and some aggressors are using family pets to maintain that control. Counselors at abuse shelters say that leaves victims with the tough choice of saving their pets or saving themselves. The trend in domestic violence, they add, is pets getting caught in the middle. In some cases, pets are used as bait; the aggressor abuses and tortures them to get back at their spouse. That's what Shannon Norman says happened last spring: her husband took out his anger on both her and her beloved chihuahua, Chucho.
NEWS
by KSPR News and news@kspr.com | June 11, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. - Police in Springfield have made more arrests in a roundup of accused domestic violence offenders. Last week, officers put eight violent people behind bars in a domestic violence roundup. "This was something that we felt was very important for the community and for the domestic violence victims - that we try to bring these people to justice and get them arrested for their outstanding warrants," said Greg Higdon with the Springfield Police Department. Police aren't done -- officers say they'll continue to look for those who are still wanted on warrants.
NEWS
Mary Moloney, KSPR News Reporter and mmoloney@kspr.com | April 2, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Alice Beauchamp lived a lifetime of abuse. "I was raped when I was 18 and then I was raped several times, actually 10 times all together and abused for like 27 years," she said, her voice cracking. "So, this is the first time I'm able to talk about it. " Beauchamp talked about the three people who abused her. She talked about the rapes, beatings, and intense emotional abuse. "He kept telling me that I couldn't do anything and he controlled me," Beauchamp said of one person.
NEWS
by Mary Moloney, KSPR News and mmoloney@kspr.com | March 5, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- One woman who lived nearly a lifetime of abuse says she was caught up in drugs and violence. "I was dealing drugs, hustling, and drugs was my number one love.  I've put methamphetamine before my family, my friends, anything," said Donna.  "I just thought that was how life is for me.  I was raised in it.  My parents, my siblings, my friends while I was growing up in school.  That's just what I knew. " As a hustler, she became afraid of her attackers.  At times, she also suffered in silence.
NEWS
Mary Moloney, KSPR News Reporter and mmoloney@kspr.com | January 31, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Domestic violence plagues the Ozarks. Many safe houses can't spare a bed because demand for service is so high. Nationally, domestic abuse affects one in three women and one in four men. Springfield police point to domestic assault as the main reason aggravated assaults in the city jumped 20 percent from 2011 to 2012. For more than a decade, Debrah endured brutal beatings and rape. The one who promised to love her forever, her husband, did the most harm. "I was sure that he was going to kill me. I wouldn't survive very much longer; he was going to kill me. I didn't know when," said Debrah.
NEWS
by Joanna Small, KSPR News and Reporter and Photographer | January 24, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- How would you feel if your doctor asked if you were the victim of domestic violence?  That's the recommendation by a national preventive services task force. Domestic abuse affects one in the three women and one in four men, but the officials who help these people say getting them to come forward can be a challenge, and this new recommendation may help overcome that. "He used to hit me in the side of my head. " Ann is no stranger to pain. "I was pregnant with the baby and he put all of his weight on my stomach, put his hands around my throat," she said.
NEWS
Leigh Moody and Anchor | December 12, 2012
A federal study shows the homeless rate is down nationwide but Missouri is bucking the trend. The study shows the homeless rate is up almost 14 percent in Missouri over the past year, meaning shelters like the Missouri Hotel in Springfield remain close to or at capacity. Overall, there are more than 10,000 people living in the Show-me state without a roof over their heads. Two specific areas of concern are the five-percent rise among homeless veterans and homeless victims of domestic violence, which is up nearly 20-percent from this time a year ago. There are a couple of bright spots in the research, though.  The chronically homeless population went down by 22 percent and youth homeless rates dropped by about 31 percent.
NEWS
Lauren Pozen, KSPR News and lpozen@kspr.com | November 9, 2012
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. - Domestic violence is now front and center in Springfield. A recent study by the Springfield Police Department found the number of reports here are up.That increase is putting a strain on shelters. Harmony House has had to turn away over 800 people this year due to lack of space. They have just 80 beds. Harmony House uses every inch of space available. Danielle Conti with Harmony House said, "You are taking people that are coming from really traumatic difficult situations that need time to heal and process and feel safe and we have as many as eight women in room with bunk beds lined up. " Space is tight, but they make it work.
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